Carolina Tiger Rescue | Pittsboro, NC

Saving and protecting wildcats in captivity and in the wild.”

That’s the mission of Carolina Tiger Rescue. It’s one of our favorite places to visit, both for the animals and the people who work with them. Each time we visit and post Instagram photos of these beautiful cats, we’re flooded with questions about Carolina Tiger Rescue (“CTR”): Where is it? What do they do? Can I go? Do they let you touch the tigers? What are you feeding them? What do you mean you adopted tigers, do they live with you? What kind of animals do they have there?

Quick response time: It’s in Pittsboro, NC; They save wild cats, big and small; Yes, they give wonderful tours!; No, there is a no-touch policy (whew, let’s keep our fingers and hands, folks); We bring beef & chicken for them - raw; All of the cats, big and small, live in wonderful enclosures at Carolina Tiger Rescue; CTR is home to tigers, lions, ocelots, servals, caracals, bintarongs, bobcats, cougars, leopards, and kinkajous.

Please note, Carolina Tiger Rescue has a membership drive going on right now! Visit their website here to learn more about the organization, and keep up with them on facebook here! Become a member or tour the facility to learn about their efforts, meet many of these amazing animals and hear their stories.

Now before we chat anymore, let’s see some of these cats! We’d like to introduce you to two tigers we’ve adopted, as well as an ocelot.  

This is Bali. He’s been at CTR since 2010, and we love him so. He’s not on the public tour route, but as adoptive parents we’ve trained to give private tours and can head back to his neck of the woods. We feel especially lucky to be able to get back to his enclosure to visit and bring him treats. He lives in one of the most peaceful places at CTR, in our opinion.

JAM-2684w.jpg

One amazing thing about Bali is not just his size, but his ability to quickly and oh-so-quietly approach us when he sees us coming. An animal this large with such stealth is an amazing thing to witness in person. 

JAM-2681w.jpg

059.JAM_1732w.jpg

We have two house kitties at home, and Bali sits for treats just like they do. But don’t be fooled. He’s such a sweet guy, but he is no house cat. :) 

JAM_1712w.jpg

This was just seconds after Jordan tossed a chicken over the fence. And, he’s off!

JAM-2672w.jpg

Chicken found, and gobbled in about 60 seconds.

JAM-2674w.jpg

JAM-2678w.jpg

 Here is our dear Magoo, an ocelot. I don’t have any shots of him roaming about his enclosure, because he’s always immediately at the fence when he hears us. It may have something to do with us bearing meat treats.

JAM-2853w.jpg

JAM_1701w.jpg

Magoo has a very distinct growling sound, which we think sounds exactly like a motorcycle. He was absolutely making that sound as I snapped this photo.

JAM-2863.jpg

Here’s Magoo enjoying some beef shish kabob tartare. While growling. Nomnomnom. Isn’t he handsome with that belly? It’s too bad that his mates are often hunted for their fur. Especially since it can take as many as 35 pelts to make one fur coat. Sad news, Magoo. But we’ll take care of you.

JAM-2829w.jpg

JAM-2640w.jpg

JAM-2734w.jpg

 These beauties are, left to right, Christian, Kizmet, and Max. Max is our other adopted tiger. He lives with friends, and we love visiting all three of them. Here’s Jordan getting their beef tartare ready. We jokingly call these beef tips “tiger tictacs,” since they’re gone in about two seconds. Though they do still appreciate the small treats. :)

JAM-2711w.jpg

JAM-2714w.jpg

Kizmet & Max (Christian in the background), sharing some love after a tiger tictac or two. :)

JAM-2722w.jpg

We visit as many of the cats as we can, and would love to introduce you to a few more of our cat friends.

This is Rajah. He and his sister Kayla were found wandering a highway near Charlotte, NC in 2005. Thankfully CTR had a place for them to call home permanently.

JAM-2692w.jpg

Kayla shares an enclosure with Rajah. On this day they both decided to relax in the shade as we passed by after our visit with Bali. 

JAM-2699w.jpg

Jellybean, as you can see, is CTR’s white tiger, their one and only. They’re very rare and highly sought-after. Jelly is one of the most talkative cats at Tiger Rescue. 

JAM-2603w.jpg

JAM-2612w.jpg

 Camilla is one of the newer rescues, and we happened upon her splashing in her pool on this visit. As soon as she saw us (and probably as soon as she smelled the meat we carried), she bounded out of the water towards the fence. Which resulted in one of my all-time favorite tiger photos. :)

JAM-2613w.jpg

JAM-2617w.jpg

JAM-2620w.jpg

 Investigating…

JAM-2621w.jpg

She seemed fairly comfortable with us after a while, rolling around like a house cat. 

JAM-2623w.jpg

JAM-2624w.jpg

JAM-2625w.jpg

 There are also lions at CTR, and this is a new guy! Roman, it was very nice to meet you. 

JAM-2746w.jpg

This is Rajahji, the elder Rajah. If you sign up for a tour, he’s the first tiger you’ll meet. He chuffs (and sometimes sprays), and is quite a social guy with guests.

JAM-2597w.jpg

Handsome guy Raj - nice teeth!

JAM-2595w.jpg

Here is a serval friend, though I’ll be honest and tell you I don’t know which one. But I’m always captivated by their markings, just like with the ocelots. Though what’s most amazing to me is their hind legs - they can jump vertically up to 10 feet in the air to catch birds. Ten feet! 

JAM-2735w.jpg

JAM-2736w.jpg

Here is Camilla’s enclosure-mate, Roscoe. Hiding out in his den as the clouds rolled in.

JAM-2750w.jpg

That’s all of the photos we have for now, but will continue to grab a few more with each visit to CTR. We bring friends and family when we can (so if you’d like to join for a private tour, please let us know), and encourage everyone we know to visit with or without us. They can always use your support, whether it’s through a membership, taking a tour, donations (monetary donations, volunteering, or food donations are all appreciated), or adoption.

And in closing, here’s a cute shot of my favorite private tour guide. :)

JAM-2591w.jpg

~JAM

« Previous post Next post »